Announcing firmware updates for the 6-Series and A10 System | Technology For Worship Magazine

Reedsburg, WI, – Sound Devices is pleased to announce firmware v4.60 for the 6-Series, v2.60 for the Audio Limited A10 System, and the A-FLIP accessory.
Version 4.60 features Auto-Mute for the 688 and 633. Auto-Mute silences the AUX output of the 633 or 688 while in stop mode and will resume output during record and playback. Additionally, the 688 and SL-6 now support use of the A-FLIP and the Lectrosonics SRc-941 as a SuperSlot receiver.
“Auto-Mute is a long-requested feature that we are happy to offer for the 6-Series,” said Paul Isaacs, Director of Product Management and Design at Sound Devices. “With Auto-Mute, only relevant material is output during Record and Playback.”
Version 2.60 for the A10 System offers system enhancements, reduces tuning time of the system, and supports the new A-FLIP. This adapter can be attached to any A-SL to change the orientation of the A10-RX, adding flexibility to the A10 System.
Firmware updates for the A10-System can be found   here   and 6-Series can be found   here . To learn more about the A-FLIP visit  Audio Limited .

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Why we need to rethink education in the artificial intelligence age – Rural Economy Technology

Some Brookings Institute insight into the future of US education with the recognition that our education system is not meeting the STEM challenge, nor are our communications networks, especial in rural areas and low-income neighborhoods meeting the challenge. Without Government initiatives, the US is falling behind and our global leadership is at stake.

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Anveshana – Winners 2019 | Shridevi Institute of Engineering & Technology

Students of SIET have won 3rd and 4th Prize in Anveshana 2019 Science Project Competition organised Agasthya Foundation, Bengaluru During Feb 2019.
Ramyashree and Team from SIET ECE have won 3rd Prize with Cash Award of Rs. 25,000/- (Above Picture)
Chethan and Team from SIET EEE have won 4th Prize with Cash Award of Rs. 15,000/- (Above Picture)

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Epstein students win at technology competition – Reporter Newspapers – Stock Sector

Six Epstein School students in Sandy Springs placed took home awards March 9 at the 2019 Georgia Student Technology Competition, a statewide competition now in its 18th year. Students Heather Grant and Marion Kogon took home first place in the productivity design category for grades 5 and 6, according to an Epstein press release. Jordan…

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IT&N’s innovation to fast track student allowance payment – Mangosuthu University of Technology

The Department of Information Technology and Networks (IT&N) has collaborated with the University of Zululand (UniZulu) to create a new student allowance payment system. Applications Manager in the IT&N department, Sherwin Mudaly, said “the major benefit of the system was that students are now going to be paid in real time. It was developed to pay student allowance payments directly into the student bank account. It will replace a system that is still dependent upon manual work,” said Sherwin. The new system is expected to be implemented soon.
Other universities are already showing interest in using the new system and have made enquiries to the IT company Adapt IT who built the new system. Adapt IT has recognized the innovative thinking that stemmed between MUT and UniZulu, and has already rewarded MUT with 50 system development hours equivalent R74 000 in monetary terms. Sherwin said IT&N has already started the planning processes to use these hours for new ITS system innovations in to provide improved system work flow processes to the MUT community. Posted in MUT News

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Building More Empathetic Communities with Technology

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How can we foster better, more empathetic communities? This is the question I brought with me a few weeks ago when I built “Conversation Kitchen” at the annual Civic Digital Fellowship Social Impact Hackathon.
Like many other recent college graduates, I’m daunted by the prospect of finding or creating communities outside of school. Today, more than ever, bonds between people are built online — whether that be through email listservs, Slack, or Facebook meme groups. While this online communication helps us keep in constant contact with faraway friends and coworkers, it’s difficult to build a deeper level of trust, empathy, and understanding through a computer screen. In creating “Conversation Kitchen,” our hackathon team sought to figure out the best way to foster these empathy-building, in-person interactions.
As a Civic Digital Fellow this summer, I’ve had the opportunity to see the benefits of being part of an empathetic community first hand. Living and working together with the other Fellows has given us many opportunities to learn more about each others’ experiences and perspectives both in civic tech, and in a broader context.
As someone who comes to the world of civic tech from the private sector, learning about how other folks have experienced technology through non-profits, startups, and government agencies has greatly broadened my own perspectives. Incorporating these ideas into my own set of beliefs has only been possible because of the trust I have for others in our community.
Fostering this underlying trust is essential in learning from, and empathizing with, other members of the cohort. Whether it be for an activist group, or a neighborhood association, creating stronger bonds between members results in a more empathetic and successful community.
Through our hackathon project “ Conversation Kitchen ,” we sought to apply this principle of trust building to create empathy between groups of people with opposing viewpoints. Our goal was to foster strong communities between folks who would not otherwise come together due to their opposing beliefs. Our application creates groups by ensuring a variety of viewpoints on a given topic, as well as a variety of personality traits that may impact the role individuals have in their groups (e.g. leadership or stubbornness).
We used current debates over DC Transit as a first dividing issue. We asked questions about people’s opinions on funding and accessibility of transit to form groups of people who disagree on these issues and build empathy between them. We imagine our web app being used in the future to connect folks on different sides of more contentious national political issues. Conversation Kitchen would be a useful tool in any situation in which there is a lack of empathy between folks who have differing perspectives.
We focused on blending online conversation with offline communities by organizing and encouraging small-group in-person meetups. We ask folks who join a group to first work on building rapport, then move onto more difficult conversations once trust has been built within the group.
Spending part of a weekend brainstorming and developing a community and empathy-building tool was an exciting and mind-opening experience. Working on this with other members of the Civic Digital Fellowship, each with their own expertise and passions, made that experience even better.
As I finish up the fellowship this summer and move onto my next adventure, I hope to build upon what I’ve learned from this project by helping to foster empathy and trust in whatever community I become part of next.
Alberta Devor is a 2019 Civic Digital Fellow working at the General Services Administration. She is a recent graduate of Brown University with a degree in Computer Science.

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Brown CS ’19 // Civic Digital Fellow // NYC // albertadevor.com 🍍

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